13 Field Template

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Consider the Field Template the “Playground” for your Dobot Magician! Place the robot’s base on the edge of the paper where it is outlined, and use the pallet to palletize, pick and place, or stack objects. There are also some “dip tanks off to the side to do dipping operations.

This template can be used with all of the activities, except we have found it best to use just a blank piece of paper when writing “CIM” with the pen end effector in Lesson 1.

The graph in the background is to scale, 1 box = 1 mm, and the pallet squares are evenly spaced at 30 mm on center for easy palletizing.

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12 Input-Output Guide

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The Input/Output Guide was put together by Jim and I and tested extensively to make sure that inputs and outputs worked smoothly and were well documented.

The first page outlines how peripherals are attached to the Dobot, and the second page is the Digital Signal guide that shows you how to test inputs and outputs.

Page three is Inputs & Outputs for the Magician V1, and page four is exclusively devoted to the V2.

Page five just gives you a great way to test a handshake module with a voltmeter, and an idea for wiring multiple outputs for one cable.

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06 Presentation-Dobot Blockly Hardware Connections

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This presentation is meant to be an introduction to all of the different devices that can be interfaced with the Dobot Magician in terms of hardware. Both Jim and I suggest using this in the classroom as a student resource, rather than a presentation that you go over slide by slide; Although, there may be some value in introducing some of the hardware that you may use in your class at this point.

Just give it to the kids as a resource, let them download it, and use it as they need it!

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00 Presentation: Dobot Blockly Programming

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This presentation is meant to be an introduction to all of the different Blockly commands, and where to find them in the interface. Both Jim and I suggest using this in the classroom as a student resource, rather than a presentation that you go over slide by slide.

Just give it to the kids as a resource, let them download it, and use it as they need it!

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14 Blockly-Curriculum

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Introduction:
This curriculum was designed to teach high school and college level students the basics of
robotics, as used in industry, using the Dobot Magician, DobotStudio software, and the
blockly programming language.
Through these activities, you will also be able to make the robot interact with other devices
including, but not limited to:
● Arduino microcontrollers
● Color sensors
● Conveyor belts
● Other outputs like motors and LED’s
● VEX Cortex microcontroller
● Infrared sensors
● Other robots
● Other inputs like microswitches and
sensors
Introduction: Defining Artificial Intelligence
A lot is being reported about artificial intelligence and robotics in industry, and it is probably
one of the most controversial issues surrounding robots… If you do not understand it. The
way that we wish to address it in this document depends on how it is defined. For our use
here Jim and I will define it as such:
Artificial Intelligence(AI): Using computers, microcontrollers, and other
electronic devices to replicate intelligent behavior to automate tasks and make
manufacturing more efficient.
We would like to look at AI from a practical standpoint. How AI helps us in industrial robotics
and automation is what intrigues us the most and what we are most passionate about. In that
vein, the next question to answer then is: “How does this curriculum embody artificial
intelligence?”
With the above definition of AI, isn’t a lot of automation & robotics considered artificial intelligence? Take these instances of what students will be able to do with a dobot and this
curriculum:
● Make a motor run forward or backwards depending on what time it is.
● Make a light bulb light up when you want it to. Better yet, make different color lights
light dependent upon what you want.
● Determine what color an object is and then decide where to put it.
● Change the speed of a motor dependent upon where an object is.
● Mathematically calculate where to put the next box on a pallet, or to stack objects
perfectly.
● Make a robot talk to another robot and decide when to perform certain actions.
● Make a robot talk to another device to perform a myriad of automation and
manufacturing tasks.
● Make a robot 3D print a necessary part for you, or laser engrave a barcode on each
passing part of an assembly line. All of these are possible with only a Dobot Magician, A microcontroller, this curriculum, a little
determination, and a lot of curiosity.
Introduction: Defining Industry 4.0
Here’s another term that is being widely used in Industry, and being touted as the next
greatest thing in manufacturing. What does it mean? Again, we have to define it for ourselves
so that we can move forward, and possible embrace it. From our limited research and
knowledge of the topic we would like to define it this way:
Industry 4.0: The 4th industrial revolution where manufacturing facilities employ
computers, machines, and technology, that have inputs and outputs that allow them to
wirelessly connect to ever larger manufacturing systems.
No more is a drill press just a drill press. It may be a CNC machine that has a vision system
that knows where a hole has to go as well as what size it is. Also this machine can be
programmed on the fly to change rapidly if a different order comes in from a different vendor.
It’ll even tell the customer when the part will be done, and in some instances, some factories
will even let customers watch their parts being produced via webcam. The list of tasks above
in the definition of AI are all within reach of high school and college students alike, and aren’t
these tasks all a part of Industry 4.0?
With a Dobot Magician, this curriculum, and a bunch of spare parts, computers, and some
ingenuity, students will definitely be headed in the right direction towards being a part of the
future of Industry; no matter what it’s called when they graduate.

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11 Blockly-Workcell Design

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A robotic workcell is defined as the complete environment around a robot. This environment may include tools, machines and/or other robots.

In this activity you will use a robot and a microcontroller system to recreate a workcell. Your workcell will incorporate all of the devices that you have learned about in previous activities including:
● Inputs & outputs
● Sensors
● Conveyor belt
● Machines
● Robots
You and your team will design, organize, create, program and test a full work cell.

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10 Blockly-Handshaking Dobot to VEX

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Often robotic arms need to communicate with other devices or controllers in a work cell, or factory. This is called HANDSHAKING and can be done between different machines, devices and robots. It is a very simple form of communication and is done with simple ones and zeros; or “ons” and “offs”.

In this activity you will use all of the knowledge learned in previous activities to make a Dobot Magician Robot communicate with a VEX cortex.

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09 Blockly-VEX to VEX Handshaking

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Often the process of handshaking goes beyond a robot’s need to communicate with another robot. In industry the process of have Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) communicate with each other, or Robotic arms can be just as simple as having two robots communicate.

It is a very simple form of communication and is done with simple ones and zeros; or “ons” and “offs”.
In this activity we will reuse the theory of communicating with simple ones and zeros; or “ons” and “offs” from the previous activity. We will replace the robots with two microcontrollers. For this activity, we will focus on the wiring and syntax programming for two VEX microcontrollers.

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08 Blockly-Arduino to Arduino Handshaking

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Often the process of handshaking goes beyond a robot’s need to communicate with another robot. In industry the process of have Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) communicate with each other, or robotic arms can be just as simple as having two robots communicate. It is a very simple form of communication and is done with simple ones and zeros; or “ons” and “offs”.


In this activity we will reuse the theory of communicating with simple ones and zeros; or “ons” and “offs” from the previous activity. We will replace the robots with two micro-controllers. For this activity, we will focus on the wiring and syntax programming for two Arduino micro-controllers. Robotic arms need to communicate with other robots in a work cell, or factory. This is called HANDSHAKING and can be done between different machines, devices and robots. It is a very simple form of communication and is done with simple ones and zeros; or “ons” and “offs”.

The limit switch attached to each microcontroller will control the on and off function of the other controller’s motor.

Video Coming Soon…

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