Posts Tagged ‘machine’

How to hold material in the xsTECH

What’s the best way to hold _____________ in my xsTECH router? From strap clamps to double sided tape, we have it all! Learn how to hold everything including circuit boards, flat stock, and blocks in this video.

Can you believe that you can use strap clamps, sticky tape, and all kinds of ways to hold stuff down… sometimes a little ingenuity helps as well. The strap clamps it comes with are pretty cool too, but they won’t hold down everything.

Have a great way of holding something down? Let us know!

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Will a vice fit in an xsTECH?

Answer:

That’s a fair question. When trying to come up with an aswer though, you’ll have to do a bit of research, as it will depend on what you’re machining. Also, there are many different one’s out there.

Luckily Jim did some research for us… maybe this video will help guide you to an aswer.

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Make Cool S*** TV: Youtube Series

This is an interesting “TV show” on YouTube that highlights a different manufacturer in each episode.  The first episode is about a company called “Made In America Manufacturing” which is a small machine shop that makes hard to make parts out of hard to work materials like stainless steel, titanium, and inconel (a superalloy).

The show has tons of vocabulary and the owner of the machine shop describes machining processes very well. Thanks for all of the good, basic information. It is however a bit long for use in the classroom, but I could see students watching on their own, just because of the name.

And about the name… Sorry Kyle, but with the name you gave the show, you shot yourself in the foot for the educational market.  after a week only 380 views? If you aimed for the educational market, I feel you would have many more views. Just my opinion… I look forward to seeing what the other topics for later episodes will be. Check it out for yourself!

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Caz HS Tech Labs Gets a Faro 3D Laser Scanner

Cazenovia students will be able to utilize a Coordinate Measurement Machine in the near future. This device is used for measuring the physical geometrical characteristics of an object and is manually controlled. It is a 7 degree of freedom arm with a laser end effector that you could use to scan objects. You can then scan an object, bring it into 3D modelling, and modify it or 3D print it. A brief overview of this CMM can be downloaded HERE.

They are used in industry to reverse engineer parts, produce highly accurate 3D models, and for inspection of manufactured items.  It is widely used in many industries including:
  • Aerospace: Alignment, Tooling & Mold Certification, Part Inspection
  • Automotive: Tool Building & Certification, Alignment, Part Inspection
  • Metal Fabrication: OMI, First article inspection, Periodic Part Inspection
  • Molding/Tool & Die: Mold and Die Inspection, Prototype Part Scanning

Students in the Engineering & Technology programs will be able to utilize this piece of equipment in many different ways including scanning to a 3D print, and parts inspection in Computer Integrated Manufacturing class. Students in the Intro to Engineering Design class would be able to use it to measure parts in the reverse engineering unit of the course. It may even be an interesting tool for art students as well!

A parent of a former student has donated the device which he uses in all aspects of the product development in his company MCM Design, Inc.  This is a local company doing global design work right here in Cazenovia. One of the goals of this small local company is to develop products to be manufactured cost effectively in the U.S.A.  What better way to do it than pass down technology to the people who will be using it in the future: our high school engineering students! We will be highlighting this company and the work they have done at a later date.

Here’s a cool idea for a project with it from Jay Leno: (This is the company that manufactures the arm that we are getting as well!)

 
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A CNC machine for $4000? Really?

Thanks Ryan Dennes!  He sent me an email outlining a new CNC machine that will cut everything up to and including aluminum, for only $4000. The post for it is already baked right into HSM too, so you should be able to send code for it right out of Inventor! It’s called the Pocket NC.

I am NOT saying go rogue and buy one… do NOT say “well Chris and Jim said…”. I have not even seen one in action yet, except for a few Youtube videos. Just saying that if you had an extra $4k kicking around and you know a bit about CNC, this machine may do all we need it to to make projects for CIM. Oh… and it has a fifth axis to boot!  Just let us know how it works out for you.

Here are a few Q & A’s from their FAQ:

How much does the Pocket NC cost?

A Pocket NC costs 4000USD plus shipping.  

What materials can you cut with the Pocket NC?

The Pocket NC can cut wax, plastic, wood, and aluminum.  Basically any materials with hardnesses up to that of aluminum.

What size parts can you make with the Pocket NC?

The travel of the Pocket NC is 4.3 inches (109 mm) in X, 5.0 inches (127 mm) in Y, and 3.5 inches (89 mm) in Z.  How your part fits in this envelope is highly dependent on your setup.

What kind of software will I need to run the Pocket NC?

We are partnering with Autodesk to offer a one-year commercial subscription to Autodesk® Fusion 360™ with each of our machines.  After the one-year period is over, Fusion 360 is free for enthusiasts, hobbyists, and startups and is compatible with Windows and OSx.  You may also use whatever CAD/CAM software you would like, we would be happy to help facilitate the generation of a post processor for our machine.

Are you going to make a machine with a larger work area?

We do plan to design a machine with a larger work area, however it is still a couple of years from being released.

You can go and see more videos at their Youtube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1zXa_8xzMDIdP2k90cYflA   Continue Reading

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Jim Hanson

Chris Hurd

 

 

 

 

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