Posts Tagged ‘churd’

Dobot Magician Start Up Procedure

Question:

What’s the proper way to actually get my Dobot Magician to connect to my computer?  What software is required? Is it expensive?  

Solution:

Number one, the software is free and it is called Dobot Studio. I am told it always will be, and it is updated regularly. You can install it on as many computers as you wish. Did I mention it is free? As for start up procedure, it is very easy. just watch the short one minute video clip below.  A couple other things while we are at it…. be sure that the power supply power cord is plugged in all the way; this is a common reason for not connecting. Also please heed the warning below and NEVER plug inputs or outputs into the robot while it is powered “ON”.

Never connect or disconnect inputs or outputs to the robot while it is powered up or connected to the software. Damage to the robot will result!

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Caz HS Tech Labs Gets a Faro 3D Laser Scanner

Cazenovia students will be able to utilize a Coordinate Measurement Machine in the near future. This device is used for measuring the physical geometrical characteristics of an object and is manually controlled. It is a 7 degree of freedom arm with a laser end effector that you could use to scan objects. You can then scan an object, bring it into 3D modelling, and modify it or 3D print it. A brief overview of this CMM can be downloaded HERE.

They are used in industry to reverse engineer parts, produce highly accurate 3D models, and for inspection of manufactured items.  It is widely used in many industries including:
  • Aerospace: Alignment, Tooling & Mold Certification, Part Inspection
  • Automotive: Tool Building & Certification, Alignment, Part Inspection
  • Metal Fabrication: OMI, First article inspection, Periodic Part Inspection
  • Molding/Tool & Die: Mold and Die Inspection, Prototype Part Scanning

Students in the Engineering & Technology programs will be able to utilize this piece of equipment in many different ways including scanning to a 3D print, and parts inspection in Computer Integrated Manufacturing class. Students in the Intro to Engineering Design class would be able to use it to measure parts in the reverse engineering unit of the course. It may even be an interesting tool for art students as well!

A parent of a former student has donated the device which he uses in all aspects of the product development in his company MCM Design, Inc.  This is a local company doing global design work right here in Cazenovia. One of the goals of this small local company is to develop products to be manufactured cost effectively in the U.S.A.  What better way to do it than pass down technology to the people who will be using it in the future: our high school engineering students! We will be highlighting this company and the work they have done at a later date.

Here’s a cool idea for a project with it from Jay Leno: (This is the company that manufactures the arm that we are getting as well!)

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Caz High School Students to go to space…Again!

A crew of ten Engineering design & development (EDD) students in Cazenovia High School’s Tech Club have decided to go to the air again. In 2015 they went into space the first time when sent a High Altitude Balloon into space.  They brought back HD video and science data that included temperature, pressure, altitude, and GPS headings as they flew to over 120,000 feet and recovered the balloon. See the article and video here. This year students have decided to try to circumnavigate the globe with another high altitude balloon and track it on the internet with a circuit that they have built.

Mike and Jules Hojnowski from Cornell trekked to Caz to help the students build the trackers. The Hojnowski’s are avid Ham radio operators and enjoy travelling around to help students build their own trackers following Mike H’s design. Everyone started at 7:30 am and spent the first three hours placing more than 240 surface mount devices; some so small you could fit 50 of them on your pinky nail. The circuit board tracker contains a tiny radio device that transmits GPS data back to Earth, as it flies 40,000 feet above the clouds. The tracker is charged by two solar panels, as batteries will not work in extreme temperatures.  These solar panels charge a super-capacitor that powers the whole device. A lightweight tracker is crucial to the success of their mission and the whole device will weigh less than 15 grams.

The afternoon was spent troubleshooting the devices, reflow soldering components, and extensive testing. After the parts were all placed correctly and powered up, they were programmed with Mr. Hurd’s ham radio call sign: KD2GJE. When it flies, you will be able to track it here on WSPR, and possibly here on APRS.fi. Stay tuned to see how they move forward with the project, as they plan to launch two of them in the Spring. More info will be available as we get closer to a flight date.

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Jim Hanson

Chris Hurd

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