Posts Tagged ‘chris’

How Accurate is the Dobot Magician?

Question:

Just how accurate is the Dobot Magician?

Answer:

Short answer: very accurate. To 0.007″ to be exact. Verified by an independent study student of mine using statistical analysis.
3bots In May of 2017  I purchased a Dobot Magician from an Etsy shop, as that was the only way to get them at the time. It is now available at In-Position Technologies here for $1499.00.  Use the code “chrisandjimcim”  or mention us on your PO and you will get free shipping as well as US based help and warranty service!
First thing I did, and when I say I, I mean an Independent Study student (props to Vincent Paglia , who will be going to RPI in August, see his info below!) was do an Accuracy test. They claim it is accurate to 0.2 mm, and our test on our robot proved that it was actually more accurate than that.  Try that with the robot you use for CIM class now! The only one more accurate in my classroom is my Fanuc, and it cost almost 15 times what the Dobot cost!

  For those of you into POE and “data” you can you download the spreadsheet with data points, graphs, ect here: 2017 Dobot Repeatability Data.  But this histogram says it all:
Dobot Accuracy Graph When all was said and done, our robot was accurate to about 0.18mm overall. That is 0.007″ for those of you in England… I must say, very impressed with the accuracy.

_MG_5137-4Special thanks to one of my best ever Independent study students for all of the work he did this year with me  with the Dobot. 
Vincent Paglia, son of Thomas and Regina Paglia, has been awarded a scholarship from SME. He plans to study engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the fall.  Vincent has played varsity and JV soccer; has played hockey at Center State for four years at the bantam and midget levels and for the high school as a senior; and is also a member of the Tech Club and National Honor Society.  He received the Rensselaer Medalist Award for outstanding achievement in math and science in 2016 and was also a Scholar-Athlete by the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) while playing soccer and hockey. Continue Reading

My Toolbars’ Are Missing in Inventor! Where’d They Go?

Question:

Every once in a while (on a daily basis…) one of my students ends up missing one or more toolbars in Inventor. Can you tell me how to get them back?

Answer:

I bet it happens randomly, and they have done nothing to make it happen, right?!?! Well no matter… watch the video below to see how to get them back!

Continue Reading

The Dobot Magician: A REAL Educational Robot?

 
3bots

About a month ago  I purchased a Dobot Magician from an Etsy shop, as that was the only way to get them at the time. Try telling your business office you want to use school money to buy something on Etsy….  Luckily, it was a grant, and I was able to purchase it. It is now available at In-Position Technologies here for $1499.00.  Personally, I see the Laser and the the 3D printer head as novelty items, but I really want to focus on the accuracy, and the ability to teach robotics programming with it, so I will stick to the basics with PnP’s palletizing, roll angles, linear moves, joint moves and jumps.

First thing I did, and when I say I, I mean an Independent Study student (props to Vincent Paglia , who will be going to RPI in August, see his info below!) was do an Accuracy test. They claim it is accurate to 0.2 mm, and our test on our robot proved that it was actually more accurate than that.  Try that with a Lynxmotion Al5D!

  For those of you into POE and “data” you can you download the spreadsheet with data points, graphs, ect here: 2017 Dobot Repeatability Data.  But this histogram says it all:
Dobot Accuracy Graph When all was said and done, our robot was accurate to about 0.18mm overall. I must say, very impressed with the accuracy.

Do the Outputs Work?

Good question!  The answer is sort of. As of first testing, the digital outputs, at least the one I tested, workd all day long. The PWM didn’t fair so well. Early in the day I plugged in a servo, and made it move forward and backward no problem. After lunch tried to write a program using it, it crashed the software. Every. Single. Time. See the video below for more info.

Outputs in the manual do not match the ones in the software, and are then called out differently on the arm itself. After a little work with it, and some programming and a few blown LED’s (some outputs are 12 volts…) Vincent and I figured out how to do PWM and Digital outputs with the Dobot Magician.
This demo uses a continuous rotation servo as the grinder, an LED and a bunch of servo extentions I scarfed off of the “other” robots in my classroom.  

 A Grinding Operation with the Dobot and a  Continuos Rotation Servo

This robot is the smoothest, speediest, most accurate and repeatable one I have ever used in CIM class… except for my Fanuc.

Dobot Outputs: Using a VEX Pnuematic Feeder with the Dobot Magician

Vincent and I designed and built a prototype pneumatic parts feeder like the one in Robocell. It works with an output from the arm, just like it is supposed to in industry. Stay tuned for the final version; I will make it later this summer while I am at the University of Texas at Tyler.

_MG_5137-4Special thanks to one of my best ever Independent study students for all of the work he did this year with me  with the Dobot. 
Vincent Paglia, son of Thomas and Regina Paglia, has been awarded a scholarship from SME. He plans to study engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the fall.  Vincent has played varsity and JV soccer; has played hockey at Center State for four years at the bantam and midget levels and for the high school as a senior; and is also a member of the Tech Club and National Honor Society.  He received the Rensselaer Medalist Award for outstanding achievement in math and science in 2016 and was also a Scholar-Athlete by the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) while playing soccer and hockey. Continue Reading

See you at the University of Texas at Tyler!

University-of-Texas-Tyler-LogoWell CTI’s have been doled out finally!  Jim will be at CalPoly Pomona, Ryan Dennes will be at the University of Kentucky & Bucknell and I will be at the University of Texas at Tyler with Ryan Stobaugh . There are a total of nine sessions going on for CIM throughout the summer so check your schedule and sign up now. Below is some information about University of Texas at Tyler. See the map below for location of UT Tyler.
 

What’s there to do around Houston?

independence-plaza-nowWell, I plan on going to a Houston Astros baseball game, eating my way through some of america’s top authentic mexican restaurants, and take the Bayou City by bike. I also want to go to the Space Center at Houston.   Here’s a list of must do’s that can be found here at Tripadvisor no matter what your interests.

About UT Tyler

A member of the renowned University of Texas System, The University of Texas at Tyler carries a proud tradition of high-quality students and academic opportunities. Located on 200 acres, UT Tyler is a safe university with a park-like setting of lush trees and wildlife. The campus consists of 15 modern buildings arranged around two lakes.
UT Tyler is ranked among the top 15 public master’s-level universities and among the top 51 master’s-level universities overall in the West region by U.S. News & World Report.
One of the state’s fastest-growing universities, UT Tyler provides the individual opportunity you would only expect at a small private university – without private university tuition expenses. We are attracting excellent students who often out-perform graduates from all other Texas public universities on state licensing exams in engineering, nursing, and education.
Texas became a PLTW Affiliate in 2001 through the University of Houston Center for Technology Literacy. The Texas-PLTW affiliation transferred to The University of Texas at Tyler Ingenuity Center in 2005.
The mission of the Ingenuity Center is to increase the technological literacy and creativity of Texas’s youth. The UT Tyler Ingenuity Center develops instructional resources and teacher professional development activities to help middle and high school teachers enhance their skills for teaching about technological literacy and innovation education.
The Ingenuity Center provides summer training for teachers, as well as conferences for counselors, administrators, and teachers.

The CIM class will be held at their engineering center in Houston. Continue Reading

Family Times in CNY: STEM Education

  churdrobotworx
Complete article as it appears in the Family Times of CNY can be found here:  http://goo.gl/qagF6H

On a warm morning in mid-June, as the final hours of the school year were winding down at Cazenovia High School, engineering and technology instructor Chris Hurd was putting the finishing touches on his 27th year with the district. But it wasn’t the upcoming summer break that had him energized—it was the classes that he still had to teach that day.

“Things have changed so much in these fields since I started teaching,” Hurd says of his long career. “I’ve gone from doing tech projects with seventh and eighth graders, to doing physics with high schoolers. You can teach a kid anything if they want to learn it. Once they apply it, they get it.”

Using hands-on problem solving to teach science, technology, engineering and math—commonly known as STEM—has become a focus for educators at all grade levels. Methods of teaching the separate, related subjects encourage learning through trial and error, with teachers guiding students’ efforts.

Hurd was one of the first teachers in the area to participate in Project Lead the Way when Cazenovia began offering STEM courses in 1999. PLTW is a nonprofit educational organization that emphasizes student exposure to problem-solving strategies and critical thinking through computer science, engineering and biomedical science curriculums. Today, Hurd is a PLTW Engineering Master Teacher—one of just 350 nationwide—helping to develop the curriculums and teaching other teachers. He was one of five educators recognized nationally this year with PLTW’s Teacher of the Year Award.

Hurd, a father of two, says programs like PLTW can have widespread influence on the modern classroom.

“My field, technology, has always been student-driven,” he says. “But PLTW has been doing that in an expanded way since before STEM was cool. I love it because I don’t ever teach the same thing twice. These fields are evolving so quickly, and the curriculum is never the same. There are updates and changes throughout the year.”

While the integration of science, technology, engineering and math education may not be as far along as some experts would like, Hurd says opportunities for interdepartmental collaboration are growing.

“The math and science departments here at Cazenovia are outstanding,” he says. “These kids come into my class already knowing things like statistics. So I can be confident in incorporating those concepts into a project. And the problem-solving we do benefits students in other classes.”

With these skills, students can, potentially, be marketable in the workforce with fewer years of college education.

                    Continue Reading

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Jim Hanson

Chris Hurd

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