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Get a deal on a Dobot Magician through Chrisandjimcim!

                   
We have found a way to get a Dobot Magician for teaching in your classroom! All you have to do is go to InPosition Technologies here: https://www.dobot.us/ and when your district makes the purchase, use the code chrisandjimcim for $100 off and free shipping!

NOTE: We do get a portion of all sales that are generated using this code, and it will be used to pay for this website. 

 

The other advantages to buying it here using this code:
  • $100.00 off.
  • Free Shipping.
  • US warranty work is done here in the United States.
  • They sell spare parts and accessories that are shipped from right here too.
  • US based email and telephone support.
  • Updated User’s manual.
  • Software is FREE. No Codes. Download HERE
  • Comes Pre-assembled.
  • Access to Word Doc Activity files as they become available
  • Access to the 3D print and laser cut accessory files as seen in the videos like the pneumatic parts feeder and the pallets.

I have just purchased 8 of them for my classroom to use within my robotics class. As I develop activities, I will also share all of them, in Word Doc format for all of you who use the code to purchase a robot. I will also share the files for any of the 3D printed and lasercut accessories that we make for it in the classroom. Very easy to program, and very powerful software that can TEACH as well as RECORD. The software is free and requires no code. Download it here.  See the quick video below!

   

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How do you install the HSM Toolstore and a Post Processor?

Question:

How do you install the HSM Toolstore and a Post Processor?
 

Solution:

 
The trick is to have the right files and know where to put them! Watch the video below as Jim tells us where to put the files that can be downloaded at the link below. Be sure to unzip them first.
reddownload Download the Post Processor and the Toolstore
 

 
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The VEX Testbed is boring….

Question:

The VEX Testbed is boring; do you know of another way to make learning RobotC programming more appealing to high school students?

Answer:

Well, in my classroom we build clawbots, then add all of the sensors to them. we then get to program the sensors on a real, mobile robot!  Kids love it and the culminating activity is a game where they get to drive the robots around; just like a real VEX competition.  In the meantime, they are learning how to program inputs and outputs, the difference between analog and digital, and the how closed and open loop systems work.

reddownloadClawbot TestBed

In the zipped folder above you will find the following documents:
  1. Clawbot Sensor Install: This document shows you how to install the sensors on the clawbot to complete some activities.
  2. Clawbot Checklist: This is a document that the students do screen captures of their RobotC programs on so that you can keep track of their progress as they go.
  3.  Cortex Wiring Diagram: An example of the Cortex wiring. I like to use a template in my class so each robot is the same; it makes troubleshooting easier. It looks like this:

If you make any changes for the better, please share them back with us so we can pass them along. Thanks for making it better!   Continue Reading

What else do we need to teach CIM?

Question:

What else do we need to really teach CIM? Are there any “extras” that you recommend?

Answer:

We get this question weekly. So here’s what we are going to do. Give you a preview to a Google doc that is live so we can update it on the fly. You will see it right below this paragraph. Be sure to scroll left and right and up and down to see all of the content! Links are live too!

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What’s the difference between Ferrous and Nonferrous Metals?

Question:

What’s the difference between Ferrous and Nonferrous Metals?

Answer:

Special thanks to John Hawthorne for some answers to this question. Be sure to see this information in its entirety HERE. There is a youtube video at the end that helps explain it too.

Ferrous Metal Examples
  • Cast iron (iron molded in a cast to achieve a particular shape. Used for everything from brake rotors to skillets)
  • Sheet iron (used in appliances like washing machines, dryers, dishwashers)
  • Wrought iron (used most visibly in fencing and gates)
  • Carbon steel (also called structure steel because it is frequently used in the construction industry)
  • Other alloy steels of various combinations (like stainless steel, used most commonly in surgical instruments and kitchen cutlery; and carbon steel, which is used to make drill bits and other tool parts)
  • Iron-based superalloys (often used to make aircraft bearing and sliding machine parts because if their heat- and erosion-resistance capabilities)

Ferrous Metal Qualities/Uses Given their strong properties, many of these metals are employed in projects that require durability and strength. That’s why they’re used in cars and other forms of transportation, construction, shipping, piping, railroad tracks, and many tools. Additionally, they tend to be highly magnetic, so that is why a stainless-steel pair of scissors or refrigerator door can attract a magnet so easily. However, because of high carbon content, ferrous metals will rust easily when exposed to moisture. The only exceptions are stainless steel (because of its high chromium content) and wrought iron.

     

    Nonferrous Metal Examples
  •  Precious metals (gold, silver, platinum—obviously used for jewelry)
  • Copper (frequently used for pots because of its ability to conduct heat)
  • Lead (used in pipes and roofing)
  • Tin (used in cans and becomes pewter flatware and other household items when made an alloy)
  • Zinc (when an alloy, it’s often used in car building and construction)
  • Aluminum (extremely common in everything from utensils to airplane parts to beer kegs)
  • Brass (used for ornamentation as well as electrical fittings)

       

  Nonferrous Metal Qualities/Uses  The lack of iron in nonferrous metals makes them ideal for uses that require repeated exposure to water and the elements of nature, so gutters, pipes, roofing parts, parts of ships, and even street and highway signs are often made of these metals. They are also highly malleable, which makes shaping them into a finished product much easier and faster. Because of their lack of magneticity, these metals are well-suited to electronic uses like in wiring. Finally, since nonferrous metals are very light but extremely strong, they tend to be used in industries where great strength and extreme light weight is necessary, such as with airplanes and canning machines.

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Jim Hanson

Chris Hurd

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